Archive for the Book Review Category

“Think Like a Programmer” by V. Anton Spraul; No Starch Press

Posted in Book Review on September 7, 2012 by vlipwig

V. Anton Spraul is an experienced computer science teacher and has taught introductory programming and computer science for more than 15 years.

The goal of this book is to teach you the creative Part of programming. It’s target audience are clearly beginners who “struggle to write programs, even though you think you understand programming languages.”
You should be familiar with at least one Programming language (it doesn’t have to be c++).

The book starts with some general problem solving techniques (e. g. always have a plan, divide and conquer) and explains them on some general puzzles.
In later chapters Problems will be solved with specific programming concepts like Arrays, pointers, dynamic memory and recursion.

You might be disappointed because Spraul doesn’t give any answers to the exercises but as Spraul states at the beginning of the book you should see them as opportunities to apply the concepts described in the chapters.

The exercises are coded in c++ but the book is not specifically about c++.  Most chapters start with a short review of the used concepts in c++.

More infos can be found here

“Team Geek” by Brian W. Fitzpatrick and Ben Collins-Sussman; O’Reilly Media;

Posted in Book Review on July 30, 2012 by vlipwig

Brian Fitzpatrick leads Google’s Data Liberation Front and Transparency Engineering teams.Ben Collins-Sussman is one of the founding developers of SVN and now manages the engeneering team for the Google Affiliate Network.
Both have a lot of experience with Open Source Projects.

The Book has a clearly defined goal – to help programmers become more effective
and efficient at creating software by improving their ability to
understand, communicate with, and collaborate with other people.

And that is the essence of this book. It explains why each relationship (not only related to Software projects) should be based on Humility, Respect and Trust (HRT).

The message of the book also applies to the relationship between team mates, team leader and team and above all to the relationship with end users.

The book gives useful tips on how to cope with complicated team mates and how managers should lead their team.

Brian and Ben explain why a team culture is so important and should be protected right from the start.

Last but not least the reader gets some tips on how to promote himself better within his company.

I really enjoyed reading this book.

Book catalog page